Our Blog

How do Dental Memberships Compare to Insurance Premiums?

February 18th, 2020

With the increasing complexity of the insurance landscape, a lot of people are turning away from their traditional insurance options toward savings clubs and memberships run by the practices they frequent. But how do you know which is really the better deal?

That depends, of course, on a couple of factors:

Do you have access to group dental insurance through an employer?

While there are exceptions to every rule, generally you’ll have affordable access to better dental plans if you work for a larger employer - places like Accenture or Publicis, for example. Larger companies are usually able to negotiate better rates for better benefits from insurance carriers. If you source your own dental insurance, you’ll usually wind up with a plan that costs you more a month for fewer benefits.

Are your gums healthy? Do you anticipate a lot of dental restorations in the next couple of years? (think crowns, fillings, bridges)

This will have a direct correlation to what makes the most sense for you - if you are reasonably healthy, don’t need a lot of dental work, and are paying a high premium, you may be overpaying for benefits you don’t really need. Similarly, if you need a lot of work and have very bare bones insurance, a membership plan may be a better option for you. If you have access to good benefits at a reasonable rate and need a consistent amount of dental work, traditional insurance is likely the way to go!

How does the cost compare between a dental membership and traditional insurance?

Let’s take two examples:

  1. Joe is insured by a large corporation for $30 a month, and comes in for 2 check ups, one with x-rays, and a moderate filling. 
    1. With his insurance, he might expect to pay $360 in yearly premiums and another $200 in copays and deductibles
    2. With a membership plan, he would pay $389 in yearly premiums, and $250 for his filling. 
  2. Brenda is insured with a self-funded plan for $50 a month and needs the same treatment as Joe.
    1. With her insurance, he might expect to pay $600 in yearly premiums and another $300 in copays and deductibles
    2. With a membership plan, she would pay $389 in yearly premiums, and $250 for his filling. 

As you can imagine, the figures can change quickly depending on what you currently pay and what you need. Curious how your coverage stacks up? Contact our admin team today and we’d be happy to run through a breakdown specific to your situation!

Exactly How Are Teeth Supposed to Line Up?

January 28th, 2020

Hi! My name’s Jess - I’m the office manager here at Strobel Dentistry and the main contributor to this blog (we usually don’t do first person here so an introduction felt in order ;) ). I very recently started Sure Smile clear aligner therapy at our office, and aside from mild and irrational fears that I’ll revert to my grade school lisp, I’m pretty excited!

Jess, Office Manager

But it got me thinking; since my teeth aren’t in need of extreme movement, I wasn’t even sure I needed orthodontic treatment at all. As it turns out, there are ways your teeth should come together that might just never occur to you if you don’t know what you’re looking for. So how, optimally, should our teeth align?

  • FROM THE FRONT:  your upper front teeth should fall in front of your lower teeth (toward your lip), and should overlap them by about 2 mm. Upper and lower front teeth should hit lightly.
  • FROM THE TOP (OR BOTTOM): The back teeth should be upright, NOT tipped toward the cheek or tongue. The tips of the cusps should fit into the grooves of the opposite teeth.
  • FROM THE SIDE: The upper back teeth should sit on the outside of the lower teeth. When the teeth go side-side, the ONLY teeth that hit should be the canine teeth.

Why Should I Care About My Bite?

Good question! An optimal bite not only allows for clear speech and efficient eating, it:

  • prevents muscle/jaw strain that can cause headaches
  • Makes teeth easier to clean, preventing decay
  • Allows teeth to wear evenly
  • Prevents undue stress on teeth that could lead to breaking or cracking

If my adventures in alignment have you curious how your bite measures up, ask us for an assessment at your next visit!

Celebrating 88 Years of Practice in 2020!

December 30th, 2019

It’s time for our yearly reflection, and here at Strobel Dentistry our hearts could not be more full with all we’ve experienced this year and everything we have to look forward to in the decade to come! A few highlights:

Dr. Isabella and Tony

Dr. Isabella got engaged! We could not be more thrilled for her and her fiance Tony to take this next step (and keep needling her for invites to the stunning wedding she’s planning in Colombia ;)).

Our hygienist Bridget and husband Mike

Bridget, our newest hygienist, tied the knot in October in a beautiful ceremony that they followed up with a 2 week European honeymoon. 

Our hygienist Aer and husband Yong

Our hygienist Aer is expecting her second baby in May! The team is really going to miss her when she’s on leave May through August, but we expect to make up for it with adorable baby snuggles.

3D printed cast

New tech! Could we let a year go by without celebrating this?? Of course not! :) Our latest addition - the 3D printer - is fitting in nicely, and our rockstar assistant Mika is working hard to integrate it seamlessly into our daily services.

2019 also saw the expansion of our in-house services: on-site night guards, complex extractions courtesy of the itinerant specialist Dr. Sam, and expanded hours for our periodontist, to name a few. 2020 promises more enhancements and improvements to keep our patients’ experience with us phenomenal!

Thank you to all our patients, friends, family, colleagues - everyone who has touched our lives and allowed us to help improve the oral health of our community members. We wish everyone a happy, healthy new year and great things in this new decade!

3D Printing: Our Newest Bit of Digital Dentistry

December 16th, 2019

3D Dental PrintingIt’s here! It’s finally here! We’ve been eyeing a 3D printer for months now, waiting for the right time to introduce one to our practice, and now the time has come. Here’s a quick FAQ on our latest technological advance!

What is 3D printing?

Very simply, a printer puts out layer after layer of thin material to build up a three dimensional object. This is often called additive manufacturing, in contrast to the “subtractive” manufacturing or milling done for our same day crowns. Instead of removing material to create an object (i.e. crown or onlay), the appropriate type of liquid resin is applied in thin layers and then cured to create the appliance or restoration needed.

3D printing has been around since the 80s and 90s, but the term and its use has recently seen a big upswing. The machines themselves are quite simple, and wouldn’t be much without the sophisticated design software that allows our dentists to design restorations, appliances and guides from start to finish in a virtual environment. At Strobel, we use Itero, Dentsply Sirona, and SureSmile software, among others!

How is 3D printing used in Dentistry?

As the technology continues to develop, the possibilities are pretty much endless! Right now, considering what will maximize resources, time, and benefit to the patient, we will be printing:

Why is 3D printing any better than traditional methods?

When evaluating any product, the most common considerations are quality, time, and cost. Bringing the manufacturing of these appliances gives us heightened control over the output, allowing us to better meet individual needs. Longer term, as we continue to integrate the technology into our practice, it will result in a considerable time and cost savings that we can pass on to our patients.